Angelika Sher, The Watermelon Eaters, 2017
 

Angelika Sher: Selected Works
September–December 2019

Angelika Sher was born in 1969 in Vilnius, Lithuania. She immigrated to Israel, where she graduated from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem and established herself as a critically acclaimed professional photographer through a series of exhibitions in Israel and abroad. The Laurie M. Tisch Gallery is honored to present select works, including many from her series The Song Of Deborah, which explores changes in her daughter, after she enlisted in the IDF. Also on view are earlier works of Sher’s, which address her own complex identity and relationship to her home country and culture.

In The Song of Deborah, Sher presents a series of works that explore the mental and emotional changes in her daughter, Debby, and Debby’s friends, who enlisted in the IDF when they turned 18. The series also reflects the change that took place in the artist as she revisited issues she herself explored when she was the same age as her daughter is now.

Sher's rich visual world is deeply rooted in European art, to which she was exposed in her childhood. She uses Christian iconography to tell a story, to educate, and to control the viewer-devotee. The iconography of Christian art is canonical, symbolic, and allegorical. Every order of colors, every detail, and every figure has precise meaning, definition, and convention of use. The same applies to the meaning behind each of the elements of the military—the ranks, emblems, units' insignias, military lingo, and the clear hierarchy. With familiar scenes from the history of art and names drawn from the New Testament, Sher explores notions of sacrifice, belonging, and separateness.

Angelika Sher: Selected Works is a collaboration with Zemack Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv. The exhibition is made possible with generous support from Louise Braver.

Gallery exhibition is made possible by the generous support of Louise Braver in memory of Jeanne and Sidney Lambert.

Gallery exhibits and programs are made possible by a generous grant from the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the support of generous individual donors.

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